Rosneft Privatization

Contrary to rumors, Rosneft has not bought its own 19.5% stake in the company from Rosneftegaz. Instead the privilege has gone to commodities trader Glencore and Qatar’s sovereign wealth fund. Each will own half of the stake, according to Rosneft CEO Igor Sechin.

The discussions were kept very quiet. There was no hint in the media at all that Glencore was even interested. I personally still have questions about the legality of the transaction, since Rosneft is (technically anyway) under sanctions. But I doubt that Glencore would have gone through with the deal if there had not been guarantees that they would not be taken to court or fined for participating. They have managed to keep to the letter of the sanctions, but not the spirit. But we are talking about Glencore, after all, as many Russians were quick to point out on Twitter.

So the deal has gone through, Sergei Aleksashenko writes on his blog, and the Reserve Fund can “sit untouched for another couple of months.”

There are four main takeaways from the deal, he says.

First, Igor Sechin came out the winner in this round. It is clear that Prime Minister Medvedev and his government knew nothing and had no involvement in the transaction. As a result, “we need to expect some external manifestation of this.” That is, Rosneft may win in other conflicts as well. For example the ongoing legal battle to access of Gazprom’s Sakhalin-2 pipeline.

That being said, it does appear that Sechin did lose on at least one of his preconditions for the sale to “outsiders”: that new shareholders would have to wait to get seats on Rosneft’s board of directors. But, Aleksashenko writes, “…judging by the words of the president… this condition has been removed, and, to some extent, Igor Sechin will be forced to live by the rules and not by concepts.”

“Third, we won’t know the whole truth about this deal for a long time. At least as long as it [Rosneft] is headed by Igor Sechin. And the main thing here is the unknown question: did the new shareholders receive any other benefits as part of this transaction or not? With Glencore it is easier. The company could be satisfied with the long-term contract with Rosneft to sell a substantial portion of its oil [220,000 barrels per day – ed.], perhaps even at about market conditions – as one of the world’s largest traders, Glencore can earn on sales of oil, and its purpose is to hold the maximum share of the market.”

But with the Qataris it is more difficult to say, Aleksashenko continues, “…they don’t need oil”, but they’re businessmen and don’t want to take a loss on their purchase.

“And, judging by how all the other transactions of Arab funds in Russia are structured, we can assume that Rosneft (or Rosneftegaz) issued the sovereign fund a protective option in case of falling prices, pledging in this case to buy back the shares.”

And finally, but not the least important, Aleksashenko concludes: “the privatization of Rosneft has not happened.” The State (in the form of Igor Sechin) is still calling the shots, with nobody to check it, “and will continue to do so.”

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2 thoughts on “Rosneft Privatization

  1. Pingback: Rosneft Scam – Nina Jobe

  2. Pingback: Triumph for Two – Nina Jobe

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