Triumph for Two

Sergei Shelin writes about the “deal” Rosneft made with Glencore and Qatar.

“…this has been presented as a personal triumph for Vladimir Putin, as unprecedented material gain for Russia, as well as a sort of grand initiative – an example of a breakthrough of Western sanctions and blockades, after which, of course, will follow all other foreign investors.”

Starting with the last point, Shelin says, the sanctions have nothing to do with it. Investors are just not interested in what Russia is selling. And they see no long-term gain from working with Russia. This deal with Glencore and Qatar “…will not change the atmosphere.”

“Glencore is a company that has long specialized in a particular kind of business, and cannot serve as an example for conventional investors.”

And the Qataris are “…prone to international adventurism”.

As for the claim that this deal will make Russia’s business environment more robust, Shelin shoots that down by noting that this deal “…does not give them [the “purchasers”] any control over Rosneft.” Everything will remain the same. Rosneft wanted to maintain control, and was not interested in sharing with others, which is why China dropped out of the running, he asserts.

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President Putin meeting with Rosneft’s Igor Sechin (kremlin.ru)

Russia is also bragging about the profit made from this deal, but Shelin notes that while 10.5 billion euros is “impressive”, it is not “a revolution in the state of material affairs…”

“This amount is equal to twelve days of exports of Russian goods. Or, say, the routine three-week fluctuations in the value of Russia’s international reserves (from $395.7 billion to 385.7 billion between the 4th and 21st of November), caused by such a prosaic reason as the weakening in the exchange rate in that period of the non-dollar currency exchange rates and the resulting revaluation of the non-dollar portion of the reserves.”

So, if this was in fact the triumph that everybody is claiming, Shelin says, it was not a victory for Russia, but for two people: Putin and Sechin. And this was clear from the TV coverage of Sechin meeting Putin to report on the transaction. When in reality it should have been an official “in charge of the sale of state property, not the corporation’s top manager…” Instead Sechin was portrayed as some kind of hero, and Shelin concludes, this “says a lot about who is who in…” Russia’s elite.

 

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