Why I Quit Twitter

I’ve been asked by several friends now about my views on the situation in the US. I have lived abroad for the last four years, so I feel like an outsider observer. Let me be clear, I did not vote in this last election. I got a lot of flak for it, but I still refuse to apologize for my decision. There was nothing in Clinton’s past record to recommend her. But Trump’s lack of experience was also worrying.

But what really bothered to me was the fact that the discussion on issues were once again pushed aside in favor of name calling and finger pointing. I think the US system is terribly broken, and needs to be reformed, but neither candidate was offering a way out. This only exacerbated my feeling of apathy. I would now self-describe as “agnostic” when it comes to American politics.

At the same time, I have been driven to quit Twitter. I initially joined the social media platform because I wanted to find others who were similarly interested in politics and foreign policy, especially in relation to Russia, a place and culture that has fascinated me for decades.

But in the past year or so I noticed that people were tribalizing. People had formed groups based on a common set of beliefs and were refusing to engage with others who held differing viewpoints. But worse than this, these groups were ganging up on people who held opposing views. Name-calling, bullying, etc. were taking place. In addition, I was blocked by several people for pointing out facts that did not agree with their agenda. No discussion took place. I just noticed one day that I had been blocked from seeing their tweets.

Far from being a place for discussion and debate that Twitter was initially, it had turned into an unwelcoming, and even sometimes frightening place. And I realized it had become a microcosm of what was happening in society at large. The fragmentation and tribalization of groups who could not see eye to eye. But instead of discussing their differences rationally, they had resorted to name calling and bullying, or just refused to talk to one another.

In addition, I had noticed for about a year or more that I was not getting many responses from people who wanted to discuss issues, but wanted to show off their own knowledge about or hatred of Russia. I laughed about it at first, but after awhile it started to get annoying. I confess I even started muting a few people because of it.

I joined Twitter initially to engage with people who had similar interests. Both to learn from others and to share my own views. And it was great for that. I met a lot of people from around the world who I would not have had I not had the platform. And I am grateful to the people who were willing to engage in discussion and healthy debate.

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2 thoughts on “Why I Quit Twitter

  1. Eric Morse

    I look forward to your further posts. They offer invaluable insight. And I’m sorry you felt driven from Twitter.

  2. David Peck

    Sorry to notice your tweets had disappeared. Always paid attention to your thoughtful posts. Learned stuff too on economic issues even if I didn’t always understand them due to being unfamiliar with East European & Russian business.
    “Alaska213”

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